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Wednesday 22 May 2019

BA (Hons) Architectural Design and Technology student, Nichole Tumbaga was inspired by an important part of Southampton's history for her final project - the Titanic. Here, she tells us about her designs for a museum and recreation centre and how they incorporate the shape of the liner and its four iconic funnels.

Tell us about your final project

I realised a Titanic museum and recreation centre. The proposed development is situated in Southampton, in the popular waterside Mayflower Park, next to the dock from where the Titanic embarked in 1912. The client, Southampton City Council, was keen to promote an acknowledgement of Titanic’s history, as the tragedy eventually defined the history of the city too. The Titanic Museum and Recreation Centre aims to become the new iconic landmark of Southampton with an imposing and impacting design which will contribute to the honour of the memory of the deceased. At the same time, it symbolises the cruise ships that have sailed from the Port of Southampton over the years. Many different facilities and services are incorporated into the design to guarantee an enjoyable experience for  residents and visitors of all ages and interests. 

Drawing of Nichole Tumbaga's building design for the Titanic Museum and Recreation Centre

Drawing of Nichole Tumbaga's building design for the Titanic Museum and Recreation Centre

Drawing of Nichole Tumbaga's building design for the Titanic Museum and Recreation Centre

What was the inspiration behind your project?

The main  inspiration behind my design of the Titanic Museum and Recreation Centre was the shape of the ship breaking in half and sinking. It’s important to commemorate the tragic event and  learn from it by constructing safer and stronger ships, and be more considerate of all the decisions we make. A bridge was included to connect the two parts of the building, which also symbolises the idea of hope of reunification. The design of the floor plan originated from the shape of the insufficient lifeboats of the Titanic which transported the survivors. The unique layout reflects the movement of turbulent water and four big internal trees reminds of the four funnels of the Titanic representing power, safety and prestige. The façade was inspired by the idea of crepuscular rays converging on the sun, streaming up from the horizon, in celebration of a new beginning.

Artist's impression of Nichole Tumbaga's building design for the Titanic Museum and Recreation Centre

nichole-tumbArtist's impression of Nichole Tumbaga's building design for the Titanic Museum and Recreation Centreaga-5

What have you enjoyed most about your time at Solent?

During my three years at Solent I was able to work in different groups of classmates. What I enjoyed the most is the fact that we all are different ages, nationalities, and have different religions, cultures and experiences we love to share. Exchanging opinions, coming together with creative projects, and working in a team is fundamental, as in the world of architecture and construction people work collaboratively. I enjoyed the humility, the openness and the deep passionate sharing of knowledge from the tutors. All the lecturers are extremely friendly - they support each student in achieving the best academic performance and they help us to create a career development plan with CVs and portfolios. 

What's next for you?

Thanks to Solent University and the guest lectures, I developed rewarding relationships. I’m enthusiastic to participate in the CIAT Awards 2019 and apply to an architectural practice. 

What advice would you give to current students or potential students?

My advice for other students is: enjoy your time at university as much as you can. It’s not just about studying and surviving to the exams, but it’s about learning with fun, connecting with people coming from all over the world and achieve your own personal growth and development. 

Success is achieved step by step - do the best you can and work hard, as the rewarding and satisfying day of graduation is closer than you might think. 

See Nichole's project and other art, design and fashion projects at our 2019 Summer Show