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The work, inequalities and lifecourse (WIL) research group brings together academics from across the disciplines who are interested in one or more of these issues. WIL provides a space for new conversations to happen and collaborations to develop, for seminars, and for sharing resources through workshops, mailing lists, and online discussions. Conceptually, we are interested in work in a broad sense - so labours both paid and unpaid, and how these fit together and change over the lifecourse. At the organisational and macro levels, we are concerned with workplace and managerial practice, shifting labour markets and skillset demands, and how inequalities are embedded within these, as well as how they can be challenged and countered in policy terms.

These concerns tap into some of the most pressing demands of our time that affect our daily lives, including worker wellbeing, the growing use of zero-hours contracts and the gig economy, shifting workforce demographics, how technology is affecting jobs, and the widening gap around work-based disadvantage.

People

Bailey Ashton Adie has a research focus on the use of heritage as a tool to alleviate poverty and inequalities through community-driven tourism projects.

Polina Baum-Talmor studies the implications of flexible employment practices for individuals and organisations within the context of the global shipping industry.

Helen Devereux researches the organisation of work and employment and the various ways in which factors related to this impact on health, safety and well-being.

Richard Elliott’s expertise lies in the areas of globalisation and migration in football.

Brian McDonough’s research focuses on the experts’ use of information and communication technology in the workplace. Brian is also interested in precarious work and the increased use of automation in society and he has also written work on ideas for a universal basic income. 

Jane Parry researches the changing nature of work and employment, how unpaid work relates to careers and shifts over the lifecourse, and how inequalities and disadvantages operate within the labour force. 

Nick Potts researches the area of value creation from a Marxist perspective, covering the source of profit, the tendential behaviour of business and its effect on inequality, both within and between countries, and the stability and environmental sustainability of the economy. 

Philippa Velija’s research explores gender relations in sport.

Events

Following a successful first year, our second series of seminars will run across the 2019/20 academic year. Find out more about all scheduled seminars on our Eventbrite page and follow us on Twitter for updates.

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