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Research undertaken by the China Centre (Maritime) explores a range of issues including maritime labour, maritime regulation and maritime technology. Find out more by reading the overviews below, or look here for a list of publications produced by China Centre (Maritime). 

Maritime labour

Welfare For Visiting Seafarers in Chinese Ports 
(Prof. Minghua Zhao, Dr./Capt. Pengfei Zhang, 2017/2018)
This research project will be launched at the beginning of 2017. It aims to promote and protect the rights of seafarers to welfare facilities and services in Chinese ports in accordance with the Maritime Labour Convention (2006), through a systematic examination of the availability and adequacy of welfare provisions for visiting seafarers whose ships call on Chinese port cities.

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Gender, Empowerment and Multicultural Crews (GEM)
(Team, 2015/2016)
This international study examines experiences of women seafarers and other stakeholders in the industry from three major maritime nations: China, Nigeria and the UK. The study analyses how women are treated in MET institutions and on board today’s commercial ships in the multicultural working environment, in order to identify good practice as well as gaps in policy and practice. The outcome of this study will contribute to the enhancement of welfare for seafarers worldwide. 

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Maritime policy and regulation

Maritime Labour Convention 2006 in China
(Dr./Capt. Pengfei Zhang, 2013/2016)
This project critically investigates the conditions of seafarers’ rights in China in legislation and practice, focusing on the restructuring process under the impact of the Maritime Labour Convention 2006. Part of the outcome of this research has been successfully published in the book Seafarers Rights in China: Restructuring in Legislation and Practice under the Maritime Labour Convention 2006 (Springer, 2016).

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Criminalisation of the Ship Masters
(Dr.Simon Daniels, 2016/2017)
This project critically investigates the conditions of seafarers’ rights in China in legislation and practice, focusing on the restructuring process under the impact of the Maritime Labour Convention 2006. Part of the outcome of this research has been successfully published in the book Seafarers Rights in China: Restructuring in Legislation and Practice under the Maritime Labour Convention 2006 (Springer, 2016).

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The English Law of Salvage and Wreck Removal
(Miss. Nicola Pryce-Roberts, PhD candidate, 2016)
Salvage law has its origins in the law of equity and has developed over centuries to encourage salvors to provide assistance to vessels in danger. Since the late nineteenth century commercial contracts, in the form of Lloyd’s Open Form, have largely been used by the salvage industry. The removal of wrecks, not just those obstructing navigable waters, but wrecks within the exclusive economic jurisdictional waters of coastal States is now not only desirable by those States but enforceable under the Wreck Convention 2007 enacted in to English law as Wreck Removal Convention Act 2011. The aim of this research is to examine the evolution of English maritime law of salvage and wreck removal.

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The First Maritime Law in China’s Song-Yuan Dynasties (960-1368)
(Miss Yuan LI, PhD Candidate, 2015) 
This study investigates the development of Chinese maritime law in the Song and Yuan period (960-1368). The focus of the study is on the translation of the Code from Ancient Chinese into English with discussions on its context of formation, commentaries on its contents, examinations on its impact and implications and attempts to associate it with China’s newly launched ambitious One Belt One Road initiative which is also called ‘the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st-century Maritime Silk Road’.

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Arctic Routing: The Third Silk Road for China?
(Dr. Shifeng YU, 2016)
This project investigates the feasibility for China to explore the arctic routing for commercial purpose. It examines how China employs her economic, political, and diplomatic means to secure a say in the Arctic affairs. It also explores how China attempts to enhance its energy security by shifting the traditional seaborne transportation routes from Suez-Malacca to arctic routing in order to support its energy import-dependent economy.

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Maritime Technology

Using LNG as Marine Fuel
(Mr. Yifan WANG, PhD Candidate, 2016) 
The use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel is now a proven and available solution to reduce vessel pollution and meet IMO’s new emission control regulations. This project aims to develop an innovative solution by introducing LNG as an alternative of marine fuel and to examine the feasibility of overcoming the challenge of reducing exhaust pollution and to improve the economic efficiency of maritime operations.

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Integrating Additive Manufacturing into Product Design: an Aid to Assembly and Recyclability (IAMPAR)
(Dr. Jilin YE, 2016)
This project aims to construct a feasibility study on integrating AM into product design to determine what possibilities/extents AM can offer to product designers wishing to simplify assembly operations (times/costs) and improve recyclability (minimising waste/costs) of the product.

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Improved Digital Competences for MET
(Dr. Marlene Calderón, 2016)
This study aims at promoting and implementing a framework for collaboration between academics and relevant stakeholders from the maritime industry. It’s overall objective is to ascertaining the current and future demand for ICT education and training in maritime courses.

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