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Solent researcher, Dr Helen Devereux, highlights the treatment of seafarers who have suffered a traumatic incident on board ship.

27th October 2020

Solent researcher, Dr Helen Devereux, highlights the treatment of seafarers who have suffered a traumatic incident on board ship.

The suspected hijacking of the oil tanker Nave Andromeda off the coast of the Isle of Wight has captivated the UK press. While the heroic efforts of members of the Special Boat Service in resolving the situation have been highlighted, little public attention has been paid to the seafarers working onboard the tanker who were caught up in the incident.

At around 10am on October 25 the captain of the Nave Andromeda set off a security alert reporting that seven stowaways onboard had turned violent and were threatening the crew after the crew attempted to detain the stowaways in a cabin. The vessel was several miles off the coast of the Isle of Wight, and was scheduled to berth in Southampton.

The 22-person crew secured themselves in the citadel, a small room in the interior of the ship which is designated as a place in which to take shelter in the event of a security incident. It is understood that the crew remained sheltered in the citadel, a single room with no windows, for approximately ten hours.

Read Dr Helen Devereux's article in full on The Conversation